IRJONNEKUNK

Veterinary medicine

The coherent, high-intensity light of lasers induces a variety of biochemical processes in cells, acting as a catalyst in processes that would otherwise start slowly, with difficulty, or not at all. These cellular processes result in faster cell proliferation, accelerated revascularization, reduced inflammation and oedema, pain relief, and local immunostimulation. Wound healing will be accelerated, the scars left behind by wounds will have nicer cosmetic appearance, the treated animal’s pain will be alleviated, and the mobility of affected body parts will improve.

In veterinary medicine, laser is used primarily for the treatment of wounds and secondarily for joint problems. Laser therapy is a globally applied and preferred solution for the treatment of joint and muscle injuries of racehorses.

For the treatment of skin surfaces and for accelerating wound healing primarily the laser devices working with a red light can be recommended. If treatment has to be aimed at a tissue 5–6 mm below the skin surface, infrared laser should be used because animals have stronger and more pigmented skin than humans.

In outpatient clinics preferably tabletop laser devices should be used, while for treatments to be performed in the patient’s home handheld lasers meeting the specific treatment purpose are recommended.

Although the output power of the laser device does not influence the quality of treatment, it has a major impact on its duration. Thus, the higher the output power of the device, the shorter the treatment duration can be, which is advantageous for both the treated animal and the veterinarian.